U.S. Coast Guard, National Archives

Journalist Ernie Pyle’s account of D-Day

Below you’ll find the introduction to Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ernie Pyle’s account of what he experienced and wrote about in the days immediately after the Normandy landings. Continue reading at the Fargo Forum.

NORMANDY BEACHHEAD, June 12, 1944 – Due to a last-minute alteration in the arrangements, I didn’t arrive on the beachhead until the morning after D-day, after our first wave of assault troops had hit the shore.

By the time we got here the beaches had been taken and the fighting had moved a couple of miles inland. All that remained on the beach was some sniping and artillery fire, and the occasional startling blast of a mine geysering brown sand into the air. That plus a gigantic and pitiful litter of wreckage along miles of shoreline.

Continue reading Mr. Pyle’s account at the Fargo Forum here.

Learn more about Mr. Pyle here.

“Into the Jaws of Death — U.S. Troops wading through water and Nazi gunfire”. A LCVP (Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel) from the U.S. Coast Guard-manned USS Samuel Chase disembarks troops of Company E, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division (the Big Red One) wading onto the Fox Green section of Omaha Beach (Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France) on the morning of June 6, 1944. American soldiers encountered the newly formed German 352nd Division when landing. During the initial landing two-thirds of Company E became casualties. National Archives

This article was sourced from:

Ernie Pyle, InForum

Source

Josh Wolsky

Alderman for Minot, Editor and Publisher of TheMinotVoice, Developer of the #ForMinot Network,  Co-Host of #GoodTalk Minot, Advocate and Friend of the Souris River, and clearly -- all things #MakeMinot.

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