On the Constant Forging Towards Inevitable Progress

Man, unlike any other thing organic or inorganic in the universe, grows beyond his work, walks up the stairs of his concepts, emerges ahead of his accomplishments. This you may say of man — when theories change and crash, when schools, philosophies, when narrow dark alleys of thought, national, religious, economic, grow and disintegrate, man reaches, stumbles forward, painfully, mistakenly sometimes. Having stepped forward, he may slip back, but only half a step, never the full step back. 

John Ernst Steinbeck III (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was one of the most famous and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. A winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962, his most acclaimed works include his novella Of Mice and Men (1937) and his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939), both of which examine the lives of the working class and migrant workers during the Great Depression. (source: Wikipedia)

originally published on The Minot Voice: February 27, 2015

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