Want to give property owners some relief? Give the firefighters back their full funding

There’s lots of talk about how the state can help reduce local property taxes, but they’re usually just shell games that involve taking money from one place and giving it in another. Rob Port argues that’s a great place to start, only in this instance, we should start by talking money originally meant to support

Read & Share   sourced from: InForum

Property tax frustrations prompt legislative bills

Property taxes are an annual challenge for home owners; they’re a biannual challenge for legislator. Minot Representative Larry Bellew is among those who regularly bring the issue back to the legislature; this year the bill was the same as in the past — restrict local jurisdictions from raising their levies by more than 5% without

Read & Share   sourced from: Minot Daily News

Minot Legislator Proposes Property Tax Credit for Older Residents

It’s impossible to have a legislative session without talking about taxes, and the 2023 session is no exception. It’s always a question of who should pay and how much. And this session, a couple of bills related to property taxes propose for older residents to pay less; one of them is sponsored by Minot Representative

Read & Share   sourced from: InForum

North Dakota lawmakers weigh income, property tax cut bills

The State of North Dakota’s budget surplus is among the reasons Governor Burgum and legislators are signaling tax relief, but there’s no consensus yet on what it should look like. Jack Dura and Jeremy Turley, in a joint news story between The Bismarck Tribune and Forum News Services, have the details on the property tax

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Deadline approaches for homestead & disabled veteran tax relief

The deadline to apply for two property tax relief programs is approaching. Jill Schramm has the program details on the Disabled Veteran & Homestead Tax credits at The Minot Daily News.

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(TIF)Tax Increment Financing Simplfied

TIF stands for Tax Increment Financing. In a very simplified way, It works like this. Say you want to put a second-story addition on your one-story house. The second story will add three bedrooms and $100,000 of value to your house. And you know what comes with new value, right? Yep, added taxes. That new

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Property Tax Notices In The Mail

It’s that time of year. The property tax notices have gone out and they’ll be landing in your mailbox soon. Take a deep breath and count to ten before you open them. Minot property owners are seeing a substantial increase largely due to the voter-approved school bond issue that’s paying for our second high school

Read & Share   sourced from: Minot Daily News

This is what happens when you cap property taxes; it’s not good

Property taxes — we all hate them. Naturally, as a result of our disdain, we seek to remove that which we don’t like. This attitude is prevalent in North Dakota. In the past, we’ve voted down initiated measures that sought to eliminate property tax; in the recently closed legislative session, the House killed a bill

Read & Share   sourced from: Los Angeles Times

Gov. Burgum signs bill for ND social services redesign

Historically, social services in North Dakota have been delivered by the counties. But moving forward, a regionalized system made up of 19 social service units will be the new norm. Governor Burgum signed Senate bill 2124 last week; the full news release is below. — Official News Release, Governor Burgum — BISMARCK, N.D. – Gov. Doug

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So, you’re pissed about your City taxes going up? Me too

Sometimes, maybe the best you can do is to make everyone angry. With three months on the job as a member of City Council and now a budget under my belt, that’s my ‘lesson learned’ at this point. And boy was that budget a doozy. If you’re not familiar with what’s coming your way, I

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Minot’s Taxable Valuation Drops by 7%

The City of Minot Assessor, Kevin Ternes, released the City’s annual report Tuesday. The report is presented to Minot’s City Council which also serves as our City Board of Equalization. The 2017 True and Full Value of all property in Minot is down approximately 7%, total valuation is just over $4.5 billion. The full annual

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Letter: Should the School Land Trust Board be Gambling with $3.5 Billion of Our K-12 Funds?

I’ll explain why North Dakota’s property taxes are unnecessarily high, and how we can resolve this travesty. The federal government conditioned North Dakota statehood on the legislature providing a uniform system of free public schools. (Article VIII, Section 2). This is not an unfunded mandate. The federal government gave North Dakota, in trust, section 16

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North Dakota lawmakers question proposed state takeover of county social services costs

Last year, lawmakers approved proposals that shift some funding for social services from the counties (property tax) to the state (state revenue). But the viability of that plan remains a question, as well as the counties commitment to using those dollars for property tax reductions.

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Ward County Residents Dispute Property Values with County Board

Property taxes were the issue of the day at Tuesday’s regular meeting of the Ward County Commission. Get the story from KMOT News.

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Say Anything Blog: Governor Jack Dalrymple Exaggerates Tax Relief By Nearly 70 Percent

Rob Port at Say Anything Blog takes exception to the Governor Dalrymple’s language touting tax relief. His main problem, the bulk of the relief is a transfer of spending from local governments to state budget, not an actual reduction in taxes.

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MARC Vote Fails by 2 -1 Margin

Final vote tallies: NO: 3788 | YES: 1862. The result of the vote means nothing will change for Minot property owners or shoppers. The Park District will continue to be funded by property tax. Minot’s sales tax rate will remain at 7.5%.

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